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Poll of the Week: Best Moments of Q


With a laundry list of accusations, enemies, nicknamed “The God of Lies”, Guinan doing the cat claws, described as “obnoxious”, “interfering”, a “pest”, and Picard’s glowing character reference of “devious and amoral and unreliable and irresponsible and… definitely not to be trusted,” how could we not cover the most wonderful, the sublime, and the irresistible charms of Q?

As a powerful, almighty, and divine-like entity from a race of faux-celestial beings known collectively as the Q, Commanding Officers of starships were briefed on the existence of this super influential race. Q would usually appear in humanoid form, dress in the uniform of a Starfleet Captain, and in every instance where he appeared, Q immediately commanded the stage. The obnoxious and sometimes dangerous being turned up on the bridges of the USS Enterprise, USS Voyager, and appeared on Deep Space Nine, to hassle the Captains with an underlying guise to better understand the human race for their folly and their actions, all with the best interests for the survival of Humanity kindling beneath. 

Star Trek has in him one of the finest antagonists ever known, who eventually — through much, much trial and error — becomes a friend.

This week, we’d like to know…

What is your favourite moment of Q throughout the Star Trek series?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Poll of the Week: Space Is Darkness and Silence


Over the years, science fiction has become synonymous with the weird and the wonderful, and the downright spooky. Twinning with the likes of horror and thrillers, such as the X Files and Doctor Who, during its run, each series of the Star Trek franchise has found something creepy and fantastic about exploring the edges of our understanding, our universe, and where the fringes of our reality lie. Week on week, Star Trek explored these ideas in sometimes fun and frolicking episodes, sometimes whimsical, sometimes philosophical, and now and then, we all had to get a cushion ready.

The horror effect is brought to bear in the movies, too. In The Wrath of Khan, parasitic ear bugs are used by Khan to crawl into the victim’s brain, wrap around the cerebral cortex, and turn the unwilling host into a compliant slave, going as far to inflict merciless pain on the victim if they fought against the subdermal orders. Frightening to think about. Gross to watch. First Contact ensured many of us developed an adequate fear of the Borg when Lieutenant Hawk became one with the collective, succumbing to the attacking Borg, and returns in Borg form to attack Picard.

From traditional horror to the more psychological in Voyager’s episode “The Haunting of Deck Twelve”, as Neelix gives a Halloween campfire-style ghost story to the young Borg kids to feast their fears upon. A strange tale for some, a gas nebula cloud for others, the space alien roams the deck, seeing the next victim. Or there’s the Next Generation episode, “Night Terrors”, with plenty of the tropes we like to see in a good sci-fi horror, such as Dr Crusher hallucinating the morgue stuffed with corpses all sitting up, the crew of the USS Brattain who murdered one another coming through the communication, and the persistent themes of insomnia.

Honourable mention: While it didn’t make it to the final list of spooktaculars, Voyager’s “Scientific Method” is, perhaps, one of the best episodes there is. Aliens doing scientific experiments are all over the ship, all over the crew, and people are dying. If you’ve not seen it, I won’t spoil it for you, because honestly, it’s one of my favourite episodes of Voyager, if not Star Trek, ever. Strong acting performances all round make it superb. Go watch it. You won’t be disappointed.

Dishonourable mention: Of course, we can’t let this slide past us without mentioning the actual ghost story (kinda), TNG’s “Sub Rosa”, where Dr Crusher fornicates with a ghost in a candle. There. It’s in here, it’s had a mention, let’s just move on. 

Considering this is the final leg before Halloween, I’ve selected a couple of my favourites which sent my pulse racing the first time I saw them, so, this week we’d like to know…

Which of these episodes gave you the frights, jitters, and jumps?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Poll of the Week: Best Female Character of TNG


Following on from last week’s poll for Best Male Character of TNG , this week we want to explore what made the women of TNG special and which of these wonderful women captured your attention week on week. 

Were you a devoted fan of Beverly Crusher? Most often the soothing voice in troubled waters, our forthright Doctor Crusher could whittle the woes in the medical world with nary a scalpel spent in the process. In the series, she slipped into the role of the ship’s Chief Medical Officer with ease, providing the contrary opinions to Picard, and the sole parent of Wesley. Arguably included to have some of the most unresolved sexual tension on screen to date, Beverly remains a firm favourite among Star Trek fans the world over. 

Or maybe you were a Troi fan?  Our non Starfleet uniform wearing half Betazoid Counsellor has inspired Counsellor characters in our Star Trek setting and continues to do so. From her affable attitude and easy way with patients, to her motherly attention to Alexander, her relationships with Worf and Riker, and the unforgettable holodeck simulations of the “Wild West” (she rocks the Stetson, 😉), perchance for poker nights and a love of all things chocolate, Deanna lives up there with the greats. 

We’d be remiss if we didn’t include the wonder that is Guinan in this list, and for good reason. Far more than just the bartender (or bar keeper?) on the Enterprise, she was the sage advisor to all who came seeking wisdom for their problems, and those who didn’t realise they had any until they walked through the doors of Ten Forward.  She could frighten a Q at twenty paces, or melt Worf on the phaser range, and did all of it with a calm smile, a cheeky grin, and a trusted demeanour. 

And then there’s the wrong side of the tracks. Who liked Ro Laren? A Bajoran Starfleet officer raised in a refugee camp during the Cardassian occupation, Ro had a tough childhood growing up, watching the atrocities of the regime first hand. Initially assigned to the Enterprise as part of a conspiracy (I won’t spoil it, the storyline is really good), she left in the end to join the Maquis.  With extremely strong characterisation and acting, the character became a firm favourite overnight. The “rebel with a cause” captured the hearts of everyone and devastated more when she didn’t come back. However, she paved the way for the wonder of Kira Nerys, which, fear not, we’ll explore in another poll! 

With so many wonderful women to choose from, this week we only want to know one thing.

Who is your favourite female Star Trek: The Next Generation character and why?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Poll of the Week: Best Double Act of the Series

For all Star Trek is a science fiction series, one reason it draws such a diverse range of fans is the episodes centre on the characters and the relationships cultivated on the journey the characters take throughout the run. viewers go on this journey with the characters and see how their natural chemistry works on screen, how they form strong bonds with one another, and over time, have become as iconic as the starships they live on. 

From The Original Series through to Enterprise, we saw these relationships develop. From on-screen tension, you could cut with a bat’leth, to emotional connection forged in the fires, to mentors who impart their wisdom and learn something new about themselves. We wouldn’t be anywhere in the Star Trek world without the double of Spock and Bones — so iconic in its inception that it’s replicated to full effect in later series, giving us such delights as Bashir and Garak, Neelix and Tuvok, and Data and Geordi.

This week, we’d like to know which of these pairings brought you back every week for a new episode? Who’s one-liner and well-delivered zingers left you roaring? 

Which was the most iconic duo of our Star Trek universe?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Poll of Week: Inspirational Trek to the Stars

Gene Roddenberry cut to the bone for science fiction fans across the world when he created a small starship show about a “Wagon Train to the stars” and, arguably, helped to usher in a new attitude for the modern times. Inspiration took hold in many hearts when they heard those opening lines of the first Star Trek episode, explaining to viewers his vision for the future we could have, stretching ever forward, and Trek has continued to deliver hard-hitting moments of wisdom and wonder to motivate and inspire ever since.

Star Trek has inspired multiple generations; from the cast and crew attending the rollout of the Space Shuttle Enterprise with NASA, Nichelle Nichols inspiring recruitment for the space program encouraging a new wave of talent into the industry and a young Whoopi Goldberg to begin acting, DeForest Kelley inspiring young people to start medical school, and countless astronauts who cite Trek as their motivation to reach for the stars — including Terry Virts, who had the auspicious honour of delivering the Vulcan salute to Earth from the International Space Station on the day of Leonard Nimoy’s death.

There are plenty of inspirational quotes throughout The Original Series to list here. Under the direction of Roddenberry, every episode delivered a moral tale to the viewer, to show how humanity has infinite potential to move past contemporary cultural realities of human rights, commerce, religion, sexism, war, and instead strive for peace, equality, abundance, and pursuing technological and scientific advancement. This has spread across the vast catalogue of Star Trek, giving us a space adventure that explores strange new worlds and new civilisations, boldly going where no one has gone before.

What’s your favourite inspirational quote from these Star Trek legends?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Poll of the Week: In Case of Mirror Universe, Break Glass

Star Trek throws the viewer into a universe of boundless hope and optimism for the future, striving for patience, compassion, exploration, forsaking bloodshed and violence for logic and knowledge. A universe in which humanity is learning from mistakes and endeavouring to be better. Way back in those heady days of the 1960s, the writers of Star Trek: The Original Series threw this concept and theme into the ether as the familiar faces and beloved crew of the Enterprise headed into realms unknown — into a mirror universe, where bodies were scantly clad, facial hair was proliferous, and hedonism reigned supreme, all with a tasty agony booth to top off the experience.

Barring Voyager and TNG, each series indulged in a little MU of their own, giving the viewer a glimpse into the universe where the Terran Empire reigns with a golden sword of glory; a theme later explored to a further extent in Star Trek: Discovery. While some episodes utilised the trope to explore different themes and reflect on the alternate personalities of the characters and situations, like Archer’s paranoid determination to take control of the Empire in “In a Mirror, Darkly”, others took a comical view of it, playing for the advantage of the one-off “special”. Who can forget the incredibly confused Rom in DS9’s “The Emperor’s New Cloak”?

Taking the theme a step further after the completion of the series, Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Voyager both got to indulge in their inner mirror, each with a comic book miniseries. Picard heads out to battle against the Klingon-Cardassian alliance, while Janeway becomes the Pirate Queen of the Quadrant.

This week, we’d like to know about the Mirror Universe you enjoyed the most. Did you take to Intendant Kira like a duck to water? Or revel in Kirk’s impassioned speech to Spock to let them return to their own universe. Do you long for the days of uninhibited goatee growth and unregulated agony booth access?

Which of the Mirror Universe episodes was your favourite?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Poll of the Week: Holodecking Across the Universe

Star Trek has provided us with a chance to delve into the future of technology and discover what could lie in store for us in the next 400 years. We’ve explored the variety of technology that we want to see earlier, rather than later, and every day, scientists and engineers make new discoveries fuelled by dreams of reaching those heights. Holosuites, however, could be a closer reality than once believed. Introduced in Star Trek: The Next Generation, the holodeck quickly became a fan favourite, allowing the writers to expand on the entertainments available to those posted on ship for long stretches of time as starships became mobile stations, and storytellers to explore the lines between reality and fiction, created by a perfect simulacrum.

Taking a nosedive into the world of the holodeck, the series has shown us a variety of holoprograms to entertain and thrill, and to train and educate. We can slide through the scuba-diving in Hanauma Bay, or jumping into the training simulations of Operation: Fort Knox, experience the Klingon Rite of Ascension or take coffee in Café des Artistes. They recreated simulations of great Earth battles; the Hirogen sought the holodeck for Klingon war games, while training simulations allowed Doctors the independence to learn without harm.

The holodeck also allowed the viewer a glimpse into the private life of the characters we know and love, with unforgettable moments. Picard role played as the eponymous Dixon Hiil in detective noir, Tom Paris as Captain Proton, Julian Bashir as a secret agent listening to the crooning melodies of Vic Fontaine, Data as a Deadwood gunslinger and Sherlock Holmes, while Janeway liked to kick back in Leonardo da Vinci’s workshop.

This week, we’d like you to have a think about what holodeck experiences you and your characters would like to indulge in. What could tempt you into the holodeck, or what does your character like to simulate?

What’s your favourite holodeck simulation from the series, and why?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Poll of the Week: Let The Good Times Be Gin

We raise a glass in toast at social events, we crack bottles of champagne against ships leaving dry dock for the first time, it brings parties together and gets the Doctor relaxing after a hard day in the medical office. Raising the spirit by raising the spirit is a time-honoured tradition we honour on each and every ship with one beverage or another, taking the time out of the busy shore leave schedule to sing drinking songs in the evening and recover from the hangover come the bright sunlight.

Star Trek has given us a wealth of alcoholic drinks to weave into our narratives, from all different species throughout the galaxy, including bars from one end of Bajor to the far reaches of the Klingon Empire. Quark stocked his bar to the brim with everything from the Cardassian liquor Kanar, to the Modela aperitif, while on the Enterprise we had the ever-wonderful Guinan providing her sage advice and wisdom to all who turned up at that bright blue bar of Ten Forward. So, whether your Trill adores the subtle notes of a Bajoran springwine, or your Andorian challenges themselves with a Romulan ale, there’s something for everyone to get stuck into.

For this week’s poll, we’d like to know what beverages your characters are likely to kick back on shore leave with? What alcoholic drinks, or non-alcoholic, do your characters sup when not in the pilot’s chair?

What alcoholic (or non-alcoholic) beverage does your character enjoy?

Let’s pop the cork and let the good times roll!

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Poll of the Week: Greatest Rivalry

Since the earliest times, we fill tales and saga with the struggles of the epic hero and the vicious villain, from Homer’s The Iliad through to the casting down of Lucifer in John Milton’s poem Paradise Lost. Each story shows the archetypes of good and evil, the battle between the two raging on throughout the narrative in themes, concepts and arcs. If we’re lucky, the fall comes with a redemption arc, allowing the villain to redeem themselves and repent for their actions in the eyes of the beholder, and the hero to show themselves to be magnanimous and gallant in their forgiveness.

In our beloved world of Star Trek, this epic battle between good and evil is a little more complex. The villains presented to us over the course of the series allow us a deeper look at their motivations, perhaps even what makes the villain tick behind the simplification of evil doing evil for the sake of being evil. There are glorious examples of this in the way Deep Space Nine treats their villains in Kai Winn and Gul Dukat, allowing the viewer that additional knowledge about the motivations behind their actions.

Similarly, within our own Star Trek universe of Starbase 118, we’ve had our epic battles between good and evil, between hero and villain, and our intricate narratives reflect this. And sometimes, just sometimes, evil wins.

This week we’d like to open up the discussions of those epic villains in the Star Trek universe, those wonderful rivalries which kept us glued to the serial episode after episode, and which you believe to be the best of those rivalries.

Which of these on screen rivalries was the best of Star Trek?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Poll of the Week: Technology In Question

For all the connections, friendships, and political intrigue that exists in the world of Star Trek, none of it would be possible without the technology which underpins it all. Our starships thrum with power from the warp engines to propel these huge megastructures through space across the galaxy, storing food is no longer an issue as replicators using modules and digital instructions reproduce whatever is called for, tricorders of both the medical and scientific give knowledge and information on scanned items at the push of control, and universal translators allow species to converse without requiring full knowledge of the language. 

Technology has also become the central backbone of our everyday life as well, be that communicating over vast distances with people in other languages, using smartphones to replicate tricorders to give us information wherever we are in the world, 3D printing using replicator technology to print on demand what we want, or the virtualisation of our environment using virtual reality devices transporting us out of our physical space. Wherever we look, technology is improving in leaps and bounds, faster than we can anticipate, and we’re already looking at a future filled with the technology we have seen for decades on Star Trek’s futuristic scope.

For our poll this week, we invite you to look forward into the future of this technological relationship between fictional and real.

Which of these Star Trek technologies you would most like to see in your lifetime?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


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