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UFOP: StarBase 118: The Life and Times, Part 2

Twelve years ago, Ensign Mal Avatar was assigned as the H/C/O officer to the USS Kodiak-A. Avatar, the first PC of Starbase 118’s resident historian, Glenn, rose up through the ranks to become a captain and captain-at-large to the Executive Council back in 2005. Nowadays, you’re more likely to recognize him as his newer PC, Ra-Uleyra, or via his ongoing history projects, including the Fleet Timeline and the Family Tree. In his capacity as historian, I was able to ask him several questions about the group’s history, the lineage of captains, and plenty more about the 20-year-plus timeline of StarBase 118.

You can also find part 1 here.

Q. Why do you think that some ships (i.e., the Ronin, the Constitution, the Victory) are well-established and re-launched by multiple COs, while some ships see only a few months of service before they’re retired?

A: The number one reason why a ship disappears not long after creation is because the CO left the group and the crew disbanded. The longevity of a ship is often based directly on the longevity of the commanding officer. There are also cases where a particular ship may stick around because of the name or also because of nostalgia. When a captain selects a ship and chooses to pick a historical ship, he/she might choose one simply because of the name or the class.


UFOP: StarBase 118: The Life and Times, Part 1

Twelve years ago, Ensign Mal Avatar was assigned as the H/C/O officer to the USS Kodiak-A. Avatar, the first PC of StarBase 118’s resident historian, Glenn, rose up through the ranks to become a captain and captain-at-large to the Executive Council back in 2005. Nowadays, you’re more likely to recognize him as his newer PC, Ra-Uleyra, or via his ongoing history projects, including the Fleet Timeline and the Family Tree. In his capacity as historian, I was able to ask him several questions about the group’s history, the lineage of captains, and plenty more about the 20-year-plus timeline of StarBase 118.

Q: Just about a year ago, 118’s roster of COs had been stable for some time. Now, five of those nine COs have retired, another has become a CO and taken a LOA, and we have four new COs. In your experience, are such turnovers common?

A: They tend to come in bunches it would seem and for a variety of different reasons. Most common reason for departing is real life. In my experience as a former commanding officer, the duties of the CO are far more time consuming than the life of your typical simmer. After awhile, this can be a drain, which is why often former commanding officers continue to write with the group as part of the rank and file.


Captain tenure stats in UFOP: SB118

Former captain Mal Avatar has been spearheading a great deal of historical cataloging, and recently he put together some very interesting stats on commanding officers, which we wanted to share with you. Check out these great insights below:

The average commanding officer is in command for 1.92 years, with the median just 1.32 years.

Of course, there are some outliers. The record for length-of-time in the captain’s chair belongs to the following captains:
1. Hollis Calley who commanded the Kodiak-A, Kodiak-B, and Ursa Major for 7.98 years
2. Tyr Waltas who commanded Starbase 118 Operations, Discovery-B, and Discovery-C for 7.52 years (still active)
3. Jessa Anassasi who commanded USS Constitution-B, USS Phoenix-C, USS Independence, USS Independence-A for 6.63 years
4. Rocar Drawoh who commanded Duronis II Embassy, USS Constitution-B, Starbase 118 Operations, USS Eagle, USS Victory for 6.59 years
5. Sidney Riley who commanded USS Tiger, Starbase 118 Operations, USS Independence-A, USS Tiger-A who 5.39 years (still active)

Set your calendar, Captain Waltas! You’ll break Hollis’ record on March 8, 2391.

On average, it takes 3.24 years to get the captain’s chair with a median of 2.90 years.