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Poll of the Week: Best Female Character of TNG


Following on from last week’s poll for Best Male Character of TNG , this week we want to explore what made the women of TNG special and which of these wonderful women captured your attention week on week. 

Were you a devoted fan of Beverly Crusher? Most often the soothing voice in troubled waters, our forthright Doctor Crusher could whittle the woes in the medical world with nary a scalpel spent in the process. In the series, she slipped into the role of the ship’s Chief Medical Officer with ease, providing the contrary opinions to Picard, and the sole parent of Wesley. Arguably included to have some of the most unresolved sexual tension on screen to date, Beverly remains a firm favourite among Star Trek fans the world over. 

Or maybe you were a Troi fan?  Our non Starfleet uniform wearing half Betazoid Counsellor has inspired Counsellor characters in our Star Trek setting and continues to do so. From her affable attitude and easy way with patients, to her motherly attention to Alexander, her relationships with Worf and Riker, and the unforgettable holodeck simulations of the “Wild West” (she rocks the Stetson, 😉), perchance for poker nights and a love of all things chocolate, Deanna lives up there with the greats. 

We’d be remiss if we didn’t include the wonder that is Guinan in this list, and for good reason. Far more than just the bartender (or bar keeper?) on the Enterprise, she was the sage advisor to all who came seeking wisdom for their problems, and those who didn’t realise they had any until they walked through the doors of Ten Forward.  She could frighten a Q at twenty paces, or melt Worf on the phaser range, and did all of it with a calm smile, a cheeky grin, and a trusted demeanour. 

And then there’s the wrong side of the tracks. Who liked Ro Laren? A Bajoran Starfleet officer raised in a refugee camp during the Cardassian occupation, Ro had a tough childhood growing up, watching the atrocities of the regime first hand. Initially assigned to the Enterprise as part of a conspiracy (I won’t spoil it, the storyline is really good), she left in the end to join the Maquis.  With extremely strong characterisation and acting, the character became a firm favourite overnight. The “rebel with a cause” captured the hearts of everyone and devastated more when she didn’t come back. However, she paved the way for the wonder of Kira Nerys, which, fear not, we’ll explore in another poll! 

With so many wonderful women to choose from, this week we only want to know one thing.

Who is your favourite female Star Trek: The Next Generation character and why?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Duty Post Award winner – Melody Delri’ise, USS Juneau (Sisko Tactical Cross)

Join us for another in a series of interviews with winners of Duty Post awards from our recent 2020 Awards Ceremony. Our goal is to give you insight into how our fleet’s best simmers write, and imagine their characters.

This month we’re interviewing the writer behind Lieutenant JG Melody Delri’ise  playing a female Kerelian/Argelian Tactical Officer  assigned to the USS Juneau. She  won the Sisko Tactical Cross: “The Sisko Tactical Cross is a duty post award and is awarded to those Tactical officers who have shown cunning and bravery in battle. Master strategists, and experts in targeting and shield power distribution, these officers have done the impossible to save their ship and the lives of its crew.

Tierney: Tell us a little about the writer behind the character — where in the world do you hail from?

Delri’ise: Hello! I’m Ryan, and I write for Melody Delri’ise. I’m an 18 year old, small town drag performer hailing from the outskirts of Melbourne Australia. 

As Captain Oddas Aria noted in her presentation, Delri’ise is seen as creative character that does not always fit the mold of a Tactical Officer. From where did you draw inspiration for this character?

Melody is a character I thought of on the fly and kind of built as I went. I wasn’t at all thinking about trying to make her different from the average tactical officer, or starfleet officer at that. My main thought process in creating her was figuring out how I could incorporate stuff like my love for theatre and performing, and recontextualizing that into a character that could exist in a world like Star Trek. 


Poll of the Week: Best Male Character of the Series – TNG

Running from 1987 – 1994 and in reruns for decades after, Star Trek The Next Generation set a new standard for the sci-fi franchise. With each episode, we could tune in to see Picard and company tackle new foes and explore new regions of space. Over seven glorious seasons (yes, even season two) we came to know these characters in and out and grew to love them.

But which male character of the series is the best?

Are you a Picard fan? His keen intellect and moral fortitude left us with little doubt that he was a giant among men. Even the Klingons respected the man and made him the Arbiter of Succession! Whether he was staring down the Borg, battling wits with Q, or confronting the accusations of treason from Admiral Satie in the episode “The Drumhead” – Picard was the epitome of a stalwart and resolute leader.

Were you more of a Will Riker admirer? The day-to-day running of the ship rested on his broad shoulders and he was up to the task. His loyalty to the ship was unquestioned and he stuck with the Enterprise far longer than those around him thought was good for his career advancement. He was a friend that you could get a drink within Ten-Forward but also the man you wanted leading your away team.

Data was Pinocchio come to life. He maintained innocence and curiosity about everything he encountered. Through his eyes, we got to see the world from the viewpoint of a child which made his new experiences all the more enjoyable for the audience.

Worf was such an intense and flavorful character. Living among humans, but not one of them, this Klingon tried so hard to mesh two cultures into one. We watched as he struggled to raise his son, Alexander, develop a love interest in Deanna Troi and then later Jadzia Dax on DS9, and come to terms with a debilitating injury in the episode “Ethics”. Something about this character must speak to people as Worf has appeared in more episodes across the Star Trek franchise than any other!

Who is your favorite male character from The Next Generation?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Lower Decks Interview: Ensign Talas Beck, StarBase 118 Ops

We’re here with another interview with a newer member of our community. The title of this column is “Lower Decks,” hearkening back to the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode titled “Lower Decks,” in which junior officers aboard the Enterprise-D speculate on the reasons for recent unusual actions taken by the command crew near the Cardassian border.

This month’s interview is with the writer behind Ensign Talas Beck playing a Bajoran male Helm Officer assigned to StarBase 118 Ops.

Galven: Thank you for allowing me to interview you! Could you tell us a little about yourself for our readers out there?

Talas:  Happy  to be here! Umm, what to say, well I’m 25, from the UK. In the day I develop and manage apps for a charity here in England. During the evening I love to eat pizza, chill out with my partner and my cats! I also play various games, just invested in a VR headset which has been fun! I like to do a lot of writing, currently have two books on the go, a sequel to my first book and a new idea that i’m experimenting with. The books are moving quite slowly at the moment as i’ve just started the second year of my degree in Social Sciences and Politics.

What has been your favorite moment writing with UFOP:StarBase 118?

Hiding a shuttle under the nacelle of a Borg infested ship.


Poll of the Week: Best Double Act of the Series

For all Star Trek is a science fiction series, one reason it draws such a diverse range of fans is the episodes centre on the characters and the relationships cultivated on the journey the characters take throughout the run. viewers go on this journey with the characters and see how their natural chemistry works on screen, how they form strong bonds with one another, and over time, have become as iconic as the starships they live on. 

From The Original Series through to Enterprise, we saw these relationships develop. From on-screen tension, you could cut with a bat’leth, to emotional connection forged in the fires, to mentors who impart their wisdom and learn something new about themselves. We wouldn’t be anywhere in the Star Trek world without the double of Spock and Bones — so iconic in its inception that it’s replicated to full effect in later series, giving us such delights as Bashir and Garak, Neelix and Tuvok, and Data and Geordi.

This week, we’d like to know which of these pairings brought you back every week for a new episode? Who’s one-liner and well-delivered zingers left you roaring? 

Which was the most iconic duo of our Star Trek universe?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Duty Post Award winner – Samira Neathler, USS Gorkon (Natasha Yar Pin)

Join us for another in a series of interviews with winners of Duty Post awards from our recent 2020 Awards Ceremony. Our goal is to give you insight into how our fleet’s best simmers write, and imagine their characters.

This month we’re interviewing the writer behind Lieutenant Commander Samira Neathler  playing a human female Chief Security and Tactical Officer assigned to the USS Gorkon. She won the Natasha Yar Pin: “Named after the Chief of Security of the USS Enterprise-D, killed in the line of duty, this award is given to those Security officers who have gone above and beyond the call of duty in protecting and preserving the lives of their crewmates, even at risk to their own.

Tierney: Tell us a little about the writer behind the character — where in the world do you hail from?

Neathler: Thank you for the interview. I’m born and raised in Belgium, one of the smaller countries on the European Mainland. After taking a break from simming, I stumbled on Starbase 118 about two years ago. It’s one of the most enthused and vibrant communities I’ve found so far and wished I had found the place a lot sooner.

In her presentation, Rear Admiral Reynolds notes that your writing  allows you to expertly include Neathler in sims while allowing fellow writers to contribute creatively. How do you walk that line between driving the story while allowing for collaborative writing?

Well, you mentioned it yourself, simming is all about collaborative writing. So as a writer keep that in mind and think of ways how your character can interact with others. A lot depends on the situation my character is in.


Poll of the Week: Most Interesting Villain Award

Star Trek is full of men and women of principle and moral character. It is this focus on the good people crewing our favourite ships and installations that make the universe such an appealing place. But many of the storylines found in our favourite episodes reveal villains that give the good guys something to fight. It’s this conflict that makes Star Trek such great entertainment.

Who makes the best villain across the franchise? Is it the cunning and deadly intellect displayed by Khan in Space Seed(TOS), Star Trek II and Star Trek: Into Darkness? He’s human and yet more than that. The ruthless way in which he goes after his enemies would give anyone pause. Do you feel that the familiar yet completely opposite counterparts from the mirror universe send chills down your spine? We see familiar faces that act in ways we wouldn’t expect or condone.

They are our favourite characters — and yet not. Perhaps the soulless, ever-advancing Borg with their declaration “resistance is futile” make the best enemy. How do you even reason with them? Q is another example of a recurring villain that causes havoc for our heroes. Pairing nigh-unlimited power with arrogance creates a deadly mixture which may be why Q has shown up repeatedly since his introduction in TNG.

No matter who you choose, we can all agree that without the bad, the good would not stand in such stark relief. Here’s to the good guys! But raise a glass to the baddies too!

Who makes the best villain in the Star Trek universe?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Witty Wordsmith: Eavesdropping For Better Character Development

In the real world, it’s a forgone conclusion that no person knows everything.  It’s a day to day frustration that every person carries for their entire life.  This is why it is, in writing, a tempting trap to use the information you are reading in other sims to guide your character’s actions.  If writing is your fun escape from reality, what’s so wrong with having a character who is always right all the time?

This is a problem that is common between all role-playing games for the exact same reason.  It feels good to be right and we feel good portraying our characters so we want to use all the information at our disposal to make the best decisions, even if our characters wouldn’t know that information in their situation.  This could be called metagaming, power-simming or god-modding depending on your role-playing platform.  But whatever you choose to call it, using information that you know as a writer but your character would not know in the story is a habit we can all work to break ourselves out of.

We have in previous articles discussed why metagaming or power-simming damages the narrative and hurts your collaboration with fellow players.  But in this episode of writer’s workshop we’re going to explore why doing the opposite – purposely having your character overhear something and interpreting it wrong can be a fantastic source of entertainment and drama, as well as a stepping stone to breaking the habit of metagaming and enjoying using your characters in-scene knowledge more consistently.


Poll of Week: Inspirational Trek to the Stars

Gene Roddenberry cut to the bone for science fiction fans across the world when he created a small starship show about a “Wagon Train to the stars” and, arguably, helped to usher in a new attitude for the modern times. Inspiration took hold in many hearts when they heard those opening lines of the first Star Trek episode, explaining to viewers his vision for the future we could have, stretching ever forward, and Trek has continued to deliver hard-hitting moments of wisdom and wonder to motivate and inspire ever since.

Star Trek has inspired multiple generations; from the cast and crew attending the rollout of the Space Shuttle Enterprise with NASA, Nichelle Nichols inspiring recruitment for the space program encouraging a new wave of talent into the industry and a young Whoopi Goldberg to begin acting, DeForest Kelley inspiring young people to start medical school, and countless astronauts who cite Trek as their motivation to reach for the stars — including Terry Virts, who had the auspicious honour of delivering the Vulcan salute to Earth from the International Space Station on the day of Leonard Nimoy’s death.

There are plenty of inspirational quotes throughout The Original Series to list here. Under the direction of Roddenberry, every episode delivered a moral tale to the viewer, to show how humanity has infinite potential to move past contemporary cultural realities of human rights, commerce, religion, sexism, war, and instead strive for peace, equality, abundance, and pursuing technological and scientific advancement. This has spread across the vast catalogue of Star Trek, giving us a space adventure that explores strange new worlds and new civilisations, boldly going where no one has gone before.

What’s your favourite inspirational quote from these Star Trek legends?

Click here to head to the forums now and vote in this week’s poll. Be sure to leave a comment in the thread!


Duty Post Award winner – Addison MacKenzie (Prantares Ribbon)

Join us for another in a series of interviews with winners of Duty Post awards from our recent 2020 Awards Ceremony. Our goal is to give you insight into how our fleet’s best simmers write, and imagine their characters.

This month we’re interviewing the writer behind Lieutenant Commander Addison MacKenzie playing a Human female Chief Medical Officer assigned to the USS Thor. She  won the Prantares Ribbon: “Awarded to those Medical officers who has moved beyond competence to display a true gift for the healing arts in the context of space medicine. The officers given this award should display the ability to keep a steady hand in the often hazardous conditions in which they must practice, as well as the willingness to risk their own life to save the lives of others.

MOON: Tell us a little about the writer behind the character — where in the world do you hail from?

MACKENZIE: Sure! Born, raised, and living in Cleveland, Ohio, right on Lake Erie in the U.S. I’m a former professor, but now a full-time musician and conductor when COVID isn’t a thing. I love reading and hanging out with my orange Maine Coon, Fritado.

Captain Aron Kells specifically called out your character’s “mature, professional but wryly funny” attributes. As a CMO character personal connections are important. What advice can you give others who want to create a nuanced bedside manner?

Well, I think that’s something that’s totally dependent on the character. Addison cares deeply about the welfare of her patients, as I think all good doctors do, but she also isn’t afraid to throw shade when someone deserves it. There were a number of people on the Thor who recently had physicals that resulted in some serious sass from their CMO… I think that’s just part of who she is, though. If she were a Vulcan, for example, she’d be a lot different. Probably still funny, but the humor would be very different.


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