Award Winning Interviews

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Duty Post Award winner – Kayla Drex, USS Eagle (The Cochrane Award – Science)

This month we’re interviewing the writer behind LtCmdr. Kayla Drex, playing a Human female Science Officer assigned to the USS Eagle.

She won the Cochrane Award: “Given to those Science officers who have contributed greatly to the advance of science in the midst of their Starfleet career, by staying knowledgeable about their field, participating in the community of science, but most importantly, by placing their knowledge at the service of their ship and its mission.

FORTUNE: Tell us a little about the writer behind the character — where in the world do you hail from?

DREX: I live in Richmond, Virginia. I’ve been here since 2009 when I moved up to finish my undergrad at Virginia Commonwealth University (Go Rams).

Your Captain has praised your ability to introduce realism into the scientific portion of Star Trek and your eye for details. Have you always been drawn to the Science field?

Some of my favorite Trek characters have always been scientists. I was a high school science teacher IRL too. I believe there’s a beauty and wonder in asking discovering new ways of seeing the universe. It’s been said that truth is stranger than fiction, but I would go a step further: The reality of something mysterious, once explored, often becomes more wondrous and mysterious. Even more than that, the more we know about something, the more entwined everything in existence becomes with everything else. I’ve heard (non-scientifically-minded) people say that science can be cold, calculating, and impersonal, but when you realize that the movement of quarks and atoms mirror the movements of whole galaxies … Sorry, can I have a tissue? ::wipes eyes:: Sorry, but seriously – We’re part of something amazing. If I can help people better see that, and as a result realize that their lives have greater significance than they could ever imagine, I’ve done something good. … wait. What was the question? Oh right. Yes. I like science.


Duty Post award winner interview – Genkos Adea, USS Gorkon

Join us for another in a series of interviews with winners of Duty Post awards from our recent 2019 Awards Ceremony. Our goal is to give you insight into how our fleet’s best simmers write, and imagine their characters.

This month we’re interviewing the writer behind Lieutenant Commander Genkos Adea playing a Betazoid Chief Medical Officer assigned to the USS Gorkon. He won The Prantares Award – Medical, given to those medical officers who have moved beyond competence to display a true gift for the healing arts in the context of space medicine. The officers given this award should display the ability to keep a steady hand in the often hazardous conditions in which they must practice, as well as the willingness to risk their own life to save the lives of others.

FORTUNE: Tell us a little about the writer behind the character — where in the world do you hail from?

ADEA: I am a Brit, from the rainy south east of England, where I work as both an aspiring theatre director, and a museum guide.  One I do for the love, and the other for the money… But I really enjoy both.

What advice can you give to other Medical officers in the fleet who are striving to sim realistic characters?

Interesting question. I would say; never rush anything. Take your time writing every scene and checking it over for mistakes. Also, when looking at medical-themed sims, operations or procedures, look at how we do things now. For example, I wrote a sim last year where I needed to replace a character’s liver. I studied how we do that in the modern age, and then Trekified it. It’s still to this day one of my favourite sims I’ve written.


Duty Post Award Winner – David Knight, USS Atlantis (The Black Cross)

Join us for another in a series of interviews with winners of Duty Post awards from our recent 2018 Awards Ceremony. Our goal is to give you insight into how our fleet’s best simmers write, and imagine their characters.

This month we’re interviewing the writer behind Lieutenant David Cross playing a Human Male Intelligence Officer assigned to the USS Atlantis. He won the Black Cross award: “Given to a member of the Intelligence community that strives to accomplish the goals of Starfleet Intelligence, while simultaneously upholding the ideals and structure of Starfleet command. This person has the cunning to gather intelligence by means of deceptive dialogue or espionage, as opposed to force drawn confessions. While matters of intelligence are often game changers, this person strives to attain those goals within the boundaries of their Commanding Officer, and the regulations of Starfleet.

GALVEN: Thank you for agreeing to have an interview with me! Could you tell us a little about yourself for our readers out there?

KNIGHT:  My pleasure, I have been a fan of star trek since some of my earliest memories and enjoy reading star trek novels. I have been simming my character off and on for almost a year know aboard the Atlantis as the ships Signals intelligence Officer

Winning a duty post award that’s outside of our normal range of  selected duty posts must be a great feeling! Do you take any inspiration from films, television, or books when writing your character and his actions?

To be honest, I was quite surprised when I won the black cross, I had been doing my best at the time to portray a Federation intelligence officer and never would have guessed I would even be nominated for the award. As for inspiration, I am particularly fond of the Deep Space Nine series. Specifically, Captain Sisco and Commander Worf, though the characters were miles apart as far as story lines and personalities. They both find themselves conflicted with the morality of how important the right information can be and whether acting upon it would be morally right. Moreover they both portray Intelligence work in more realistic light as opposed the more popular 007 approach made popular by the movies.


Duty Post Award Winner – Valin Dermont, USS Atlantis (The Phoenix Award)

Join us for another in a series of interviews with winners of Duty Post awards from our recent 2018 Awards Ceremony. Our goal is to give you insight into how our fleet’s best simmers write, and imagine their characters.

This month we’re interviewing the writer behind Lieutenant Valin Dermont playing a Human male Chief Engineer assigned to the USS Atlantis. He won the Phoenix Award: “a duty post award that recognizes engineers. Named for the vessel that legendary engineer Zefram Cochrane piloted during his historic first warp flight, this award goes to those Engineering officers who continue this tradition of excellence in the field of engineering. By performing their tasks with enthusiasm, imagination and diligence, by managing to make their equipment perform above and beyond its rated capacities, the officers meriting this award further the mission of their ship by their superior know-how. In short, miracle workers.

GALVEN: Thank you so much for taking the time to do an interview with me! Could you tell us a little about yourself for our readers out there?

DERMONT:  I’m just a guy doing his best outside of Trek.  I am married with a daughter and spend far too many hours working.  Writing and D&D are my two biggest passions when I can find the time!

Your duty post is an engineer. Could you explain why you chose that and is there any show/movie/book that take inspiration from?

The idea of making things work just really appealed to me.  No matter what is going on….sooner of later in an episode of Star Trek something is going to need to be fixed.  I feel Dermont is a blend of Scotty, Torres, and my own inner thoughts that I would never be so coarse as to say out loud.


Duty Post Award Winner – Rune Jolara, USS Columbia (The Order of the Valiant Award)

Join us for another in a series of interviews with winners of Duty Post awards from our recent 2018 Awards Ceremony. Our goal is to give you insight into how our fleet’s best simmers write, and imagine their characters.

This month we’re interviewing the writer behind Lt. Commander Rune Jolara playing a Al-Leyan female Intelligence Officer assigned to the USS Columbia. She won the Order of the Valiant Award: “This award is given to those ship’s Counselor who have shown great skill in protecting the mental health of their crewmates, clearly demonstrating superior ability to care, assist, and comfort those in need. They have gone above and beyond the call of duty in assisting their crewmates with their problems, and in preventing future problems from occurring.

GALVEN: Thank you so much for accepting this interview! Could you tell us more about yourself for our readers out there?

JOLARA: Thank you! I started this life in a small town on the banks of the Mississippi River in Southern Illinois. I left that town as soon as I was old enough to escape and I never looked back.

I really can’t remember a time when I wasn’t writing in one form or the other. Even during my childhood I would sneak away and write. Writing, along with painting and drawing, has helped me through some pretty dark times in my life.

My earliest memories of Star Trek is watching TOS with one of my uncles. When TNG came out (yes, I am that old), my interest (almost obsession) in all things Trek was reignited and hasn’t really stopped. Way back in 2005, I found SB118 and jumped at the chance to join a group that combined two things I love. I ended up taking a few years off but came back in 2012 as Rune Jolara.

Out in the real world, I’m a Front End Web Developer with a job I actually love… most of the time. 🙂  I’m also (slowly, very slowly) working on a sci-fi/supernatural novel.


Duty Post Award Winner – Mirra Ezo, USS Columbia (Lwaxana Troi Medallion)

Join us for another in a series of interviews with winners of Duty Post awards from our recent 2018 Awards Ceremony. Our goal is to give you insight into how our fleet’s best simmers write, and imagine their characters.

This month we’re interviewing the writer behind Lieutenant Commander Mirra Ezo playing a Betazoid female diplomatic officer assigned to the USS Columbia. She won the Lwaxana Troi Medallion: “This award is given to a member who takes on a unique and non-traditional role outside of the normal Starfleet positions, while creating a colorful and engaging character such as, but not limited to: diplomat, civilian or mission specialist.”

GALVEN: First off, thank you for taking the time with me and answering a few questions! Could you tell us a little about yourself for our readers out there?

EZO: Thank you for having me! I’ve been a member of the fleet for about 3 years now, I live in Ohio with my two daughters, and I work in the healthcare field. Pretty much very un-Mirra like.

Winning such a distinguished award in our community must be a great feeling! Congratulations by the way! The award is given to a member who’s character is colorful and engaging outside of normal Starfleet positions. Do you take any inspiration from films, television, or books when writing your character and her actions?

Thank you very much, I was honored. Honestly Mirra just kind of lives in my head. I had an idea of what I wanted to play, and she kind of just became this larger than life little creation. I primarily played her as a doctor, so I did indeed take inspiration from TV and books for someone in that high pressure type role. And if I found something funny, I went with it. 


Duty Post Award Winner – Ensign Sotak, USS Atlantis (Cochrane Award)

Join us for another in a series of interviews with winners of Duty Post awards from our recent 2018 Awards Ceremony. Our goal is to give you insight into how our fleet’s best simmers write, and imagine their characters.

This month we’re interviewing the writer behind Ensign Sotak playing a Vulcan female science officer assigned to the USS Atlantis. She won the Cochrane Award: “Awarded to those science officers who have contributed greatly to the advance of science in the midst of their Starfleet career, by staying knowledgeable about their field, participating in the community of science, but most importantly, by placing their knowledge at the service of their ship and its mission.”

GALVEN: First off, It’s an honor and a privilege that we could sit down together for an interview and answering a few questions. Could you tell us a little about yourself for our readers out there?

SOTAK:  Hello! Thank you for inviting me for this opportunity, I’m greatly honoured as well. I’m from Mexico, and I have a deep love of science and its community, so just like Sotak and other science officers in the fleet, I hope to one day contribute something to the world (or the Federation in our scientists’ case). I began simming in this group back in March of this year, and it is my first simming experience, one which I believe to be unmatchable.  It is a wonderful and irreplaceable community, and I have deep appreciation and respect for it.


Duty Post Award Winner – Randal Shayne, USS Eagle (Voyager Medallion)

Join us for another in a series of interviews with winners of Duty Post awards from our recent 2018 Awards Ceremony. Our goal is to give you insight into how our fleet’s best simmers write, and imagine their characters.

This month we’re interviewing the writer behind Lieutenant Commander Randal Shayne playing a Human male chief engineer assigned to the USS Eagle. He won the Voyager Medallion: “Named after the USS Voyager, this award is presented to those Operations officers who have shown great skill in keeping a starship in working order despite near-impossible circumstances. The officers receiving this award have advanced the field of Operations, making sure duty rosters, provisions, gear, and even recreation time are available… no matter what.”

GALVEN: First off, thank you for taking the time with me and answering a few questions. Could you tell us a little about yourself for our readers out there?

SHAYNE: Thank you for having me! My name is Quinn, and I hail from Chicago. I’m a full time student, closet philosopher, couch potato and Star Trek fanatic.

Congratulations on winning the Voyager Medallion! The award is presented to people who have advanced the field of Operations. Could you explain how through Randal Shayne you have accomplished just that?

Allow me first to properly state just how touched I was to receive this distinction, and how grateful  I still am. I genuinely didn’t expect it, which makes it difficult for me to reflect accurately on what I might have done to earn such recognition. One thing I noted going into the role of Ops Officer was the freedom it afforded, the ability to make strange connections and to do very nearly anything you wanted, within reason. I suppose it was that mentality, and the brilliant plots my fellows helped create around me, that granted me the opportunity to explore, to try new things, and to experiment, in character and otherwise.


Duty Post Award Winner – Edward Spears, Constitution (Prantares Award)

We’re starting a new series here on our Community News where we talk with a winner of a Duty Post award from our recent 2018 Awards Ceremony. Our goal is to give you insight into how our fleet’s best simmers write, and imagine their characters.

This month’s interview is with the writer behind Ens. Edward Spears playing a human male assigned to the USS Constitution-B. He won the Prantares Ribbon in this year’s ceremony.

WOLF: Winning a Duty Post ribbon as an ensign is quite an achievement – congratulations! I’d like to hear more about the writer behind the character – where in the world do you hail from?

SPEARS: I’m deeply honoured to have received this award after such a short tenure in the fleet. I am a Canadian, and have had the privilege to live in a few different parts of this country thanks to my service in the Royal Canadian Air Force. I’m currently residing in Northern Alberta, but grew up on the West Coast, and still consider that home.

Captain Rajel, in the presentation for your award, said that you’re not in the medical profession in real life. Was there an inspiration for this medical character? Perhaps a Star Trek character, a doctor from a medical drama, or maybe even a real life doctor?

I draw inspiration from many sources. I grew up watching and loving Star Trek: The Next Generation and always found Doctor Crusher to be an admirable example of a physician. I also watched M*A*S*H when I was younger, and found it powerful that they could mix humour into such serious situations. I try to apply some of that same humour when I write.