Poll of the Week

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Poll of the Week: Safety Protocols Disengaged

Insurance for Starfleet ships would be a nightmare. The ships are constantly investigating dangerous anomalies and getting into fights. But that’s not even the most dangerous thing that a Starfleet ship does – there’s a less obvious danger hidden in plain sight on most Starfleet ships: A piece of technology that is so ridiculously prone to failure or malfunction that it is one of the best-known Star Trek cliches. The holodeck.

It would seem that every time an episode centers on the holodeck, something has to go wrong with it. This could be as simple as the doors locking and the safety protocols turning off. However, that is only the start of what could go wrong with the holodeck. It could even, with a little outside interference, take on a mind of its own and actively try to hunt you down and kill you. We can only assume that the engineers responsible for the holodeck safety protocols are the same engineers responsible for the tendency of bridge consoles to explode. There are a lot of problems that could be pointed to in the holodeck’s safeguards.

This week’s poll asks which holodeck malfunction you think was the worst.

Click here to head to the forums and vote. Be sure to let us know your thoughts in the thread.


Poll of the Week: Best Movie Soundtrack?

The best soundtracks in films are those that match and enhance the ambiance and themes presented on the screen. In this regard, Star Trek composers have had a particularly difficult job: how do you compress wonder, mystery, and beauty into small auditory snippets?

Fortunately for us fans, it seems that each movie in the Star Trek franchise has been graced with a phenomenal musical accompaniment! Whether it’s the introspective, grand and powerful themes from The Motion Picture, or the pulsating, action-filled tunes from the nuTrek movies, there’s something for everyone.

This week’s poll asks you to name your favorite movie soundtrack. Head to the forums now to register your vote, and let us know what you chose in the comments section below!


Poll of the Week: Shortcut of the Week

The most important aspect of the overall story of Voyager was the distance of their journey back home to the Alpha Quadrant. Shortening the distance that the ship had to travel, or even returning to Earth immediately was a frequent plot device in Voyager episodes. It seems like at least once a season there is the potential of some shortcut getting the crew back home only to not work out or only take them part of the way. On one occasion this desire to find an alternate way home got the ship stuck in a trap they thought was a wormhole.

It’s understandable that there were occasional episodes centered around this idea. Sometimes it was a good idea to shave time off of the trip like in the episode “Night,” where the ship had to get clear of an empty void of space thousands of light years across or in the finale “Endgame.” However, it will appear in a story from time to time where it isn’t related to the primary plot. Sometimes the plot device of a shortcut to Earth was just used to raise the stakes of an episode and was never mentioned again.

This week, we want to know which Voyager shortcut you felt was the least necessary for the episode.

Head to the forums now to register your vote in the poll. Then us more in the thread below!


Poll of the Week: Best Wedding?

Whether you’re throwing rice at the bride and groom or beating them over the head with Ma’Stakas, weddings are generally happy occasions, and symbolize a sacred union between two people. From the first (aborted) marriage of Robert Tomlinson and Angela Martine aboard the Enterprise NCC-1701, to the long-awaited conjugation of Deanna Troi and William Riker, Star Trek has a long tradition of showing such ceremonies on the screen. Each has taken a different tone, different visual style and, of course, different participants.

This poll asks you which of the many marriage ceremonies shown on screen was your favorite. Did you enjoy the Japanese-styled ceremony of Miles O’Brien and Keiko Ishikawa? Or were the somber, aggressive overtones of Worf and Jadzia Dax’s wedding more to your taste? Perhaps the less than romantic civil union imposed upon Quark by the widow Grilka struck the right tone.

Click here to vote now on the forums and explain your choice in the thread below the poll!


Poll of the Week: Medical Officer by Day, Secret Agent by Night

The holodeck is one of the most versatile pieces of technology at Starfleet’s disposal. When you use the holodeck, there is a nearly limitless amount of resources at your disposal. Any item in the database from a wine glass to a shuttlecraft can be recreated by the computer. Characters with artificial personalities can be added in to either create a particular atmosphere or act out a story. The walls and floor with the yellow grid on them can become any number of vistas or locations from across the galaxy with the push of a button. Everything is controlled by the ship’s computer, adapting the program as it goes along to provide whatever the user is looking for.

Holodecks are primarily an outlet for crew recreation, but they have many other uses as well. Aspects of the Delta Flyer were originally designed and simulated using the holodeck. Authors can make a living by writing holonovels. In some cases we’ve even seen holodecks used in group therapy sessions or to covertly test someone’s loyalty to the Federation. In this week’s poll, we want to know what your character most frequently does when they use the holodeck. Do they save the world from evil villains and take part in historical battles, or are they more likely to utilize the holodeck when they’re trying to simulate a project or need to do some training exercises?

What does your character use the holodeck for most? Head to the forums to cast your vote and be sure to comment with your thoughts!


Poll of the Week: Most Interesting Parent/Child Relationship?

It’s rather surprising to realize just how many relationships in Star Trek are principally parent/child based. In most cases, these connections between beloved characters has yielded fantastic character building episodes, while often posing intriguing philosophical questions. Since the first episode to feature an example of this trend, TOS’ “Journey to Babel”, in which Spock must confront the burden of command and the needs of his family, a long standing tradition has been maintained. Whether the relationship exists for a short time (such as in the TNG episode  “The Offspring”) or for the length of an entire series (Benjamin and Jake Sisko), they almost always manage to add heart to a show that can sometimes feel clinical and dry.

This week’s poll asks you which parent/child relationship in Star Trek you found most interesting. Give us your vote by clicking here to head to the forums. Be sure to comment below the poll!


Poll of the Week: Cloaking Device Sold Separately

The Romulans, Cardassians, Klingons, and Ferengi all have very distinct styles of ship design. However, most ships share the same essential elements: There is almost always a bridge, some form of energy and projectile weapons, both warp and sublight engines, and basic living spaces for the ship’s crew.

Beyond unique design styles, most factions also have their own special technologies that are seen as trademarks of their fleets. Both the Romulans and Klingons equipped their ships with their own versions of cloaking devices. The Breen were feared for their unique energy dampening weapon that turned the Second Battle of Chin’toka into a decisive defeat for the Federation, Klingons, and Romulans. There were also non-standard features that were unique to certain classes of ship. The USS Prometheus had a revolutionary new multi-vector assault mode that could turn one ship into three built on older saucer separation technology.

If you were designing a starship, you would have to include all of the standard features in the design. But no ship has room for all of the optional extra technologies that are seen on starships across the galaxy. A ship that was transwarp-capable, cloaked, multi-vector assault mode equipped, and armed with special weapons would likely never hold together. Ships like the USS Defiant show that an over-specialized ship stuffed with advanced technology was an engineering nightmare to keep running.

If you were designing a starship, which non-standard feature would be at the top of your list?

Click here to head to the forums now and register your vote in the poll. Be sure to comment below in the thread and let us know what you think!


Poll of the Week: What was your favorite TOS actor appearance?

There are an enormous number of inter-series cameos in Star Trek, and more often than not, they’re delightful treats, designed to connect and further flesh out a universe so massive it might otherwise become tangled and unfollowable.

Quark and William Riker have enjoyed a number of these appearances, but for this particular poll, we’ll be focusing on those moments where characters from The Original Series were featured in later shows. Dr. Leonard McCoy’s tour of the Enterprise-D is the first of these shown in the pilot episode for TNG, later followed by Ambassador Spock and his attempts to reunite the Romulan people with their Vulcan brothers in “Unification Parts I and II.” The discovery of Montgomery Scott’s shuttle on the Jenolan Dyson Sphere was the focus of the TNG episode “Relics.” Sarek (featured in the aforementioned episode, shortly after appearing as a titular character in the previous season of TNG) helped to connect the old to the new, and to pass on a well-known legacy. Finally, in one of the most popular episodes of Voyager, Hikaru Sulu and Janice Rand, shown in a memory as the captain of the Excelsior, provide excellent background information into Tuvok’s past, while adding some much need variety to the show’s stories.

So which of these appearances was your favorite? Did we catch all the top appearances, or did we miss one?

Head to the forums now to register your vote in the poll. Be sure to add a comment after you vote!


Poll of the Week: It’s Been a Long Road…

Of all the famous Starfleet captains, there are few who have made as many controversial decisions as Captain Jonathan Archer of the NX-01. Archer’s Enterprise was the first warp five starship built by Humans. It was Earth’s first deep space explorer, and Starfleet itself was still a fairly new and inexperienced organization. Captain Archer did not have any of the benefits that future Starfleet captains enjoyed. He had access to less data, was a member of Starfleet when the organization was relatively weak, and didn’t have the experience of previous Starfleet captains to call on as he was the first to go out into the unexplored reaches of space. Archer would eventually serve as a role model for his successors, teaching them both what to do and what not to do.

Mistakes, even major mistakes, have happened with every captain. Some have even acted in a criminal manner. Some of Captain Archer’s decisions do make some sense given the lack of precedent and his limited experience. However, there are some decisions that seem to indicate a simple lack of good command skills. The use of an airlock to torture a prisoner is just one example. We’d like to know what you think of the command decisions of one of Starfleet’s earliest captains.

What do you think is the worst thing that Captain Archer did?

Click here to head to the forums and register your vote in the poll. And be sure to leave a comment below the poll!


Poll of the Week: Best Shore Leave Episode?

For all the work they do exploring and saving the Federation from endless threats, it seems our beloved crews don’t get anywhere near enough shore leave. But when it is shown, the results is excellent television.

With the first episode to fit this bill – aptly titled “Shore Leave” – a precedent was set. “Shore Leave” itself is often lauded by fans as a fun romp, and a standout of TOS’ first season. “Captain’s Holiday” features uptight and work-addicted Jean-Luc Picard become embroiled in a time-bending adventure on Risa. “Family” from TNG’s fourth season, follows the events of “The Best of Both Worlds”, and gives the audience a rare and cherished glimpse of characters dealing with the consequences of previous events. Incidentally, this is the only episode in all of Star Trek canon that does not include a scene on the bridge. Enterprise follows this trend twice – once with the episode entitled “Two Days and Two Nights” in its first season, and another entitled “Home”, which features Enterprise crew members dealing with the personal issues following the conclusion of the Xindi conflict.

While there are other episodes that mention or feature shore leave, these are those predicated around it. With that in mind, which shore leave episode is your favorite?

Head to the forums now to register your vote. Be sure to drop a comment in the thread below the poll!


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