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Poll of the Week: Who needs warp?

Warp drive could be described as the bread and butter of Star Trek, but it was far from the only means to get from point A to point B in the universe of our favorite franchise.

One was using a generator on a planetary surface that generated Soliton waves that would accelerate a starship to warp speeds. A second generator was required at the destination planet in order to create a counterwave to slow the incoming starship down. A civilization could be lucky enough to find alternate means of interstellar travel on their doorstep like the Vaadwaur, and their subspace corridors. Another Delta quadrant species, the Sikarians, possessed impressive transporter like technology with a range of 40,000 light years – no starship needed, just hop on the trajector pad! And who can forget the Iconians, with their Gateways to rule a vast empire? Even Starfleet, with a little Borg ingenuity, developed the Quantum slipstream drive.

So many interesting alternatives to warp drive it may be hard to pick a favorite. Tell us yours in the forums!

This poll comes from Trek Technology and science category. Where we ask questions relating to the technology and science seen in Star Trek. Often the questions will relate to how the lines between modern tech and trek tech blur more and more each day. Other times questions from this category will ask about your favorite gear or uses of the futuristic tech we enjoy seeing on the big and small screen.


Poll of the Week: Rule of Law

Over the many series and movies of Star Trek we were shown a bright future where the many worlds of the Federation live and work together as a grand galactic society. Like any society, the Federation had rules, law and courts as well as a military in the form of Starfleet. Starfleet like many militaries has a JAG and that is what we saw most often on screen.

Many episodes dealt with legal issues or were full blown court dramas! Who could forget Captain Picard being called to the stand by Admiral Satie during her conspiracy witch hunt aboard the Enterprise-D? Or when Worf was put on trial for supposedly destroying a Klingon ship full of civilians, in a rather nail biting episode of DS9? Voyager’s Doctor found himself in the center of a case that questioned his right to control his own work and his very status in the Federation. Data had to prove his sentience in court when he was to be disassembled and studied against his will.

So many awesome examples of legal themes were shown over the years. This week we ask: What episode was your favorite that dealt with the subject of law? Tell us in the forums!

This question comes from our General Trek Category. Where the polls focus on moments, characters, starships, and episodes from the various series and movies.


Poll of the Week: Simming stereotypes

Star Trek has introduced lots of different species, with their own culture and ways. Sometimes, that is so much the case, the species are an stereotype by themselves. Klingons are violent, Vulcans are logical, Ferengi are greedy.

Some characters have proven to be an exception to those stereotypes, used to show us that any species is at least as varied as human beings are. Vulcans are culturally logical, yes, but as with everything, there are more and less logical Vulcans.

The same way the series showed us all this, so do us in our simming reflect this species variations. Some of our characters are the classical stereotype. With personal quirks, of course, and with the personal vision each player might have of that species, but the typical member one might imagine for them. On the other hand, other players make a point of trying to subvert the tropes and offer a surprising twist away from what you would expect.

Both are equally good, of course. You might have a character idea in mind that fits exactly with a Klingon, and makes it easy to work and incredibly fun. Subverting the stereotypes takes more work, but can make for a surprising and amazing character.

Do you like to follow the stereotypes, or make a point of subverting them? Or try to not heed what the stereotype says, one way or the other? Discuss in the forums!

This is a new post in our category Simming Questions. Here we will be asking questions about our community, our characters and our writing, and how you interact with it all.


Poll of the Week: Landing a starship

All hands report to code blue stations! Take the warp core off line, vent all plasma from the nacelles, and divert all available power to the atmospheric thrusters. Prepare to extend the landing struts and set inertial dampers to maximum.

Starship landing, it was something rarely seen in the Star Trek universe. Many Klingon ships had the capability to land, as well as many smaller Federation vessels, and shuttlecraft. Grand Starfleet ship classes like the Galaxy and Sovereign are all simply too large. However, Intrepid and Nova class ships were both shown to have the ability. Voyager landed only a few times throughout the show’s seven year run and each time was impressive.

Do you feel that starship landing is underused in Star Trek storytelling? Do you think more Starfleet ships should be able to land on a planetary surface? Tell us on the forums!

This poll comes from Trek Technology and Science category, where we ask questions relating to the technology and science seen in Star Trek. Often the questions will relate to how the lines between modern tech and Trek tech blur more and more each day. Other times questions from this category will ask about your favorite gear or uses of the futuristic tech we enjoy seeing on the big and small screen.


Poll of the Week: Holotroubles

The holodeck! It’s one of our favorite subjects from Star Trek. On screen, this technology was used to show us fantastical stories and situations.

While the holodeck worked most days without any issues, now and then it went awry. Many episodes featured this circumstance, from Professor Moriarty taking control of the Enterprise, to most of DS9 senior staff believing they were characters in a spy adventure program, to beings from the fifth dimension mistaking the holoprogram Captain Proton for reality on Voyager. Each time the holodeck was affected in a way that put the crews in mortal danger were riveting episodes.

This week we ask: What was your favorite Holodeck troubles episode? Head to the forums and let us know!

This question comes from our General Trek Category. Where the polls focus on moments, characters, starships, and episodes from the various series and movies.


Poll of the Week: First contact disaster

Your vessel has been chosen for the important mission of first contact. The species is due to launch its first manned warp engine flight in a month, and they have already launched several warp probes to neighboring uninhabited star systems.

A duck blind has been in place for several years, and its team leaders are in the process of removing themselves from the population. They have given you many reports on the culture, and of the current political state of the planet. They report that the people of this world are likely to have a mixed reaction to the knowledge that other life forms exist in the universe. While many would accept it, the research teams report that the working class, as well as the planet’s military forces would likely respond with xenophobia due to popular belief and rhetoric.

One of the duck blind teams fails to report in, and your operations officer is unable to locate their biosigns or the dermal communicators implanted in each of them. After a week of searching other teams report strange communications about captives being taken by the military. Looking into those communications it confirms the missing team is indeed being held in an underground government controlled facility.

You can not beam in or out of the facility directly, and have little choice but to reveal your presence to them in order to rescue your team. As captain what do you do? Tell us in the the Forums!

This is a new question from our category “Morals of Trek,” where you are in the shoes of a Starfleet captain facing a dilemma any of our favorite characters could have faced in Star Trek. If your crew has faced any such dilemmas and you want to see it featured in a Poll of the Week, let us know!


Poll of the Week: Favorite bottle episode?

Bottle episodes – episodes where nearly all scenes are shot on existing sets – are a mainstay of science fiction television. There are few or no guest stars, the action tends to be light and special effects are not generally used, or are kept to a minimum in bottle episodes. This was most often done to save money over the course of a season to be able to spend more on major events and season finales.

Every series had them, some more than others! Many people really enjoy them for the more character driven plot lines, while others prefer the episodes were our favorite characters have away missions to exotic places or get in epic space battles.

So which was your favorite bottle episode? Head to the forums and tell us!

Bottle episodes gave us many excellent character driven episodes and there are so many to choose from. It was difficult to narrow down the list! This question comes from out General Trek category, where the polls focus on moments, characters, starships, and episodes from the various series and movies.


Poll of the Week: Those amazing forcefields!

Forcefields, since their introduction in Star Trek, have fueled the imagination of viewers and writers of future episodes alike. Forcefields have been shown to be able to do far more than just confine someone in a holding cell. They are the magic behind the holodeck’s feeling of reality giving form to the characters and objects that mimics the feel of the real world counterpart. They can be used to sterilize surgeon’s hands and keep patients from being able to move as well as keep an area quarantined in medical settings. They are used to contain fires starving the flames of oxygen and keeping it from spreading. In emergencies they keep the air in by closing breaches in the hulls of starships and space stations. Forcefields can even be used to create breathable places in the harshest conditions imaginable; like on the surface of an asteroid or holding back millions of pounds of water on the bottom of a sea.

This week our question is: What use of forcefields do you find most impressive? Head to the forums and tell us!

This poll comes from Trek Technology and science category. Where were ask questions relating to the technology and science seen in Star Trek. Often the questions will relate to how the lines between modern tech and trek tech blur more and more each day. Other times questions from this category will ask about your favorite gear or uses of the futuristic tech we enjoy seeing on the big and small screen.  


Poll of the Week: Watching the directive

Last week our question dealt with simming and the Prime Directive this week we wish to ask about watching the Prime Directive. Many episodes throughout the series dealt with the Prime Directive and all of the implications around it. Whether it dealt with the directive being upheld or the mess that occurred from a breach they were always fascinating and fun to watch. Many also have led spirited ethical debates in academia, print, as well as in homes and among friends.

Which Prime Directive episode was your favorite? Tell us in the forums!

There are so many great episodes that featured the Prime Directive it was really hard to narrow it down. TNG had a good number of episodes and the Prime Directive was even a theme in their movies. When the directive had to be broken or when the crews had to deal with the implications of contamination of other cultures were a common theme used to show the many aspects of the Prime Directive. Often it was broken to save people like in “Justice” when it was broken to save the life of Wesley Crusher, or when Nikolai Rozhenko beamed a group of Boraalans onto the Enterpirse-D in “Homeward.” Other times it was interference in the affairs of other worlds or civilizations that was the highlighted aspect of the Directive in an episode: Such as Section 31’s meddling in Romulan matters of state in “Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges.”  Some of the most entertaining were the times that illustrated the importance of noninterference in pre-warp societies like in “Who Watches the Watchers”, “Time and Again” or “Dear Doctor.”

So many excellent examples were shown and explored on screen there are many that were not included as options be sure to tell us about your favorite in the comments. This polls comes from our General Trek category where we as questions about our favorite moments, episodes, ships, and characters.


Poll of the Week: Living starship

Would you serve aboard a ship that was alive? One that was a sentient biological life form that traveled through space with the aid of it’s humanoid crew inside of it. We have seen vessels like this on screen a few times, such as the “tin man,” which was telepathically connected to its crew. Another is the bioships used by Species 8472, though we don’t know if their ships were sentient as well as being biological.

The idea raises a lot of questions: Does the ship have the same rights as a member of the crew? Can it make decisions to protect itself or others at the cost of those on board? Can it refuse a given command? Is it a form of indentured servitude or slavery to use a living thing in this manner?

Living starships are not as alien of a concept as you might think either. Just look at many of the Starfleet vessels that integrate biological components in the form of bioneural gel packs. They allow the computer to think out problems like a living brain would and are even susceptible to infection. Of course a ship where the hallways pulse with a heart beat is a bit different than a computer that thinks. Here in the real world even organic computing is a technology we are striving to make into a reality.

So would you serve or even feel comfortable on a living starship? Tell us on the forums!

This question is from our Trek Technology and Science category. Where we ask questions relating to the various technologies as well as scientific phenomena and principles seen in the universe of Star Trek.


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